Avoiding the Challenge

2.20.2015

Earlier this week, I discovered a foolproof formula. If one combines homemade French Toast, chai tea and an episode or two of Gilmore Girls, one can achieve a near perfect morning.  I'm sure when I was younger, I thought there was no way adults could enjoy snow (or ice in this case) days nearly as much as kids. Well, news to my younger self, one could argue adult snow days are not only more enjoyable, but far more necessary.

I often joke, with serious undertones, I could teach a course in how to relax. For some reason, many of my friends and coworkers find this a difficult feat. Don't get me wrong. I am very supportive of a productive days at home, and this ice day is no different.  Laundry was done and the kitchen was cleaned, and before the day was over, the Dyson made an appearance. However, I also believe if you have the opportunity to watch Gilmore Girls and to force a blog post, you should take it sans any sort of guilt.

Oh, you're wondering about the "force a blog post" bit? (For the sake of this post, pretend you were.) I don't want to use the overly used term of "writers block" because that would insinuate I was at least trying to write. The truth of the matter is, I've gotten into the habit of actively avoiding it all together. Sure, some of it is the crazed days at work, and the more often than not rushed evenings at home. But more than anything, it's because sometimes I don't feel up to the challenge. If words aren't coming easily, than why force it? If witty, thought provoking posts are no where to be found, why should I go looking for them? Why in the world, do I think this should be a piece of cake? My guess is the great wordsmiths of the world didn't become great in the waiting. They became great by writing.

Sometimes, life is loud and uncomfortable. Chaos is prevalent and words seem scarce, but the thing about writing is it doesn't ask for perfect circumstances. 

Dean Smith once said "There is a point in every contest when sitting on the sidelines is not an option." Now, what I know about this legendary coach is a fraction of what is left learn, but what I do know is this; he left a legacy that exceeds the four corners of the court. If I want to ever be considered a writer, in the most liberal of ways, I need to realize the desire to write grows from actually writing. Beauty can be found in the waiting, however, words may be harder to find. 

In short, this post is nothing more than my jumbled up thoughts somewhat coherently put into writing. If you made it this far, bravo. I leave you with this encouragement...

be more than you are.

be more than someone teaching defensive sets and offensive transitions.

be someone that invests in those around you.

be more than what you do.

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